Sunday Snapshot: Dusk at Clearfield Cemetery


Thrilled to have a relatively warm winter day, Jim and I went for a drive in eastern Douglas County and came upon a little country church and cemetery. According to Where the Wakarusa Meets the Kaw, members who would make up the community of Clearfield originally moved to the area as early as 1854. In its earliest days, a circuit minister would lead worship in the homes of community members; the church, which still stands, was built in 1880 and served as the Evangelical United Brethren church until 1968, when the EUB merged with the Methodist Church to become the Clearfield United Methodist Church.

Clearfield Church, which continues to offer services.

Clearfield Church, which continues to offer services.

The German-speaking community was at one time large enough to merit many small businesses, including a general store and a post office. By 1910, fewer than 20 citizens remained in the community. However, descendants of several of the original families are still in the area, including the Rodewalds, who originally owned the land the cemetery now occupies.

Looking out at the Rodewald fields from Clearfield Cemetery, where a row of headstones that say only "Died in Infancy" mark the graves of children along the eastern fence. The land that would become the cemetery originally belonged to the Rodewald family, who build the coffins for and interred on the southwest corner of their land two young Meeker boys, who died of diphtheria in 1871.

Looking out at the Rodewald fields from Clearfield Cemetery, where a row of headstones that say only “Died in Infancy” mark the graves of children along the eastern fence. The land that would become the cemetery originally belonged to the Rodewald family, who build the coffins for and buried George Meeker’s two young sons, who died of diphtheria in 1871.

Learn more:

Community of Clearfield

Clearfield Church

Clearfield Cemetery

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